CHANDRAYAAN FINDS SODIUM ON MOON

According to ISRO, the X-ray spectrometer CLASS on the Chandrayaan-2 orbiter found an abundance of sodium on the moon for the first time.

Chandrayaan-1 X-ray fluorescence spectrometer identified sodium from it's distinguishing line in X-rays which opened up the likelihood of charting the amount of sodium present on the moon.

Chandrayaan-2 charted the plenitude of sodium on the moon using CLASS short for Chandrayaan-2 large Area Soft X-ray Spectrometer said ISRO in their statement.

CLASS was created at the U R Rao Satellite Centre of ISRO in Bengaluru and it provides clean identification of sodium due to it's high sensitivity.

As per the studies, the sodium atoms seemed to be bound to the lunar grains on the surface and thus it is very likely these get moved away by solar winds or UV radiations.

It's interesting to know that sodium atoms that show existence in moon's thin atmosphere i.e exosphere, very rarely meet.

The exosphere of moon extends 1000s of kilometers from the surface into the space above.

This new discovery from Chandrayan-2 will open up possibilities to study surface-exoshpere on other airless bodies such as mercury and the others, said ISRO.

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